While it may seem like every ski mitten and glove out there is the same cut and design, you shouldn’t just pick up the first pair you spot. There are a lot of things to keep in mind when shopping around for the best ski mittens for men and women. Forget the important stuff, like the fit and the cuffs and the insulation, and you risk your hands to the elements. On cold days, not having warm hands is going to feel less like an adrenaline rush and more like torment.

That is why knowing how to shop for the best ski mittens for you is important. Fortunately, you’ve come to the right place. After spending several winter seasons skiing and snowboarding, trying and owning many different mittens, we have come up with a short list of the top-rated ski mittens for men and women.

It’s time to say goodbye to cold fingers.

The Best Ski Mittens Reviewed

Before you head off to the nearest outdoor apparel store, run through this list of the best mittens and ski gloves available. Though it’s a short list, you will be hard pressed to find ski mittens that compare in terms of quality, price, insulation, and features. We picked these mittens after considering positive reviews, materials, construction, and even the brand.

Best Ski Mittens for Men: Burton Gore-Tex Ski Mittens

Just starting out with skiing or snowboarding and not sure if you want super expensive mittens just yet? There’s an answer for that. Burton, a trusted name in skateboarding and snowboarding for years, has developed Gore-Tex Ski Mittens for men that hit all the must-haves for an affordable price. These mittens come in an array of neutral colors and are sized according to men’s hands—not unisex. This will help you get a much better fit, especially if you have bigger hands.

These gloves also feature two layers of DRYRIDE, a patented fabric that pairs with the Gore-Tex waterproof membrane, to keep your hands warm and dry throughout the day. Plus, the liner uses Thermacore insulation for added warmth. On the palm is synthetic leather with touchscreen compatibility that is guaranteed to last a lifetime. If the mittens get to be too much, the removable 4-way stretch liner can be taken out and worn separately.

And for those days when the cold is biting? You have a nifty little pocket on the top of the mitten for a heater pack. Just stuff it inside and enjoy hours of warmth and comfort.

Pros

  • Lightweight and super soft on the inside
  • Touchscreen compatibility
  • Removable fleece liner that can be worn separately
  • Zippered pocket
  • Completely waterproof and breathable
  • Thermacore Insulation, DRYRIDE Shell, and Gore-Tex for uncompromising protection
  • Removable wrist leash
  • Affordable price for high quality

Cons

  • Struggle at sub-zero Fahrenheit temperatures
  • Removable liner does not have touchscreen capabilities

Best Ski Mittens for Women: Burton Gore-Tex Ski Mittens

Buying a pair of ski mittens for women means you have to consider a couple of things, such as the sizing differences and overall styling. Though women’s ski mittens are not that different in materials and construction then men’s, most women do not want extremely bulky ski gloves or mittens, especially those who are more petite. If you are built smaller than what unisex gloves allow for, consider purchasing gloves designed specifically for women. To get the most accurate sizing for these, measure from the tip of your middle finger to your wrist.

Now, all that said, we recommend the Burton Gore-Tex ski mittens again for women. Yes, it is the same design as the one mentioned for men, but the colors and sizing are more geared towards ladies. You get a wide array of features for an amazing price, too. Burton’s Gore-Tex mittens are pre-curved and ergonomic, so you don’t have to worry about breaking in your new mittens before grabbing your skis or snowboard and hopping on the lift. Inside the gloves is Thermacore insulation and a soft brush microfiber that keeps the mittens from feeling like boxing gloves without limiting warmth. The liner also has four-way stretch.

Best of all? The little zipped heater/vent pocket. You can open the pocket to help reduce some heat if your hands start sweating, or you can hide away a little disposable heat pack for those exceptionally frigid days. These gloves are so comfortable, you will want to use them for driving the work, picking up the kids from activities, and shoveling snow, too.

Pros

  • Fashionable design
  • Liner comes with four-way stretch that fits like a glove
  • Features DRYRIDE insulation and a Gore-Tex waterproof membrane
  • Synthetic leather palm makes touchscreen use easier than ever before
  • Silicone on the palm for increased grip
  • Windproof and breathable
  • Little zippered pocket for heat pack
  • Lightweight

Cons

  • Be sure to read the size chart before purchasing to avoid sizing issues
  • Cuffs may be a bit short on some people

Best Unisex Ski Mittens: Wildhorn Tolcat Unisex Leather Ski Mittens

Looking for a reasonably priced pair of mittens that does everything you need without breaking the bank? Then check out the Wildhorn Tolcat Unisex Waterproof mittens. Wildhorn is the brand most trusted by the US Olympic Ski and Snowboard team and is also extremely popular in Utah, where plenty of skiers and snowboards live and visit annually. The Tolcat leather mittens provide incredible protection against the elements without adding bulk. The leather outer shell is lightweight, and it has been pre-curved to make the mitten more ergonomic. Inside, your fingers are kept warm by the Hydro-Tex liner, which is similar to Gore-Tex in design, as well as Thinsulate, a low-bulk insulation that locks in heat even on the coldest days.

One of the best things about this mitten is the unique cuff design. You slip on the cuff, which wraps around the thumb, first. Then you slip on the mitten. The wrist cord draws the gauntlet tight around the cuff, thereby locking out water and wind and sealing in heat. These ski mittens are even touchscreen compatible, so you can share videos and pictures of the wintry fun.

One note: Be careful with sizing. The size chart is not just for the mittens but for the Velcro wrist strap. If you get too small a mitten, the strap will be too tight.

Pros

  • Amazing and trusted quality – Wildhorn is the supplier for the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Team
  • Has 4 layers of insulation and protection from the wind, cold, and water
  • Completely water-resistant from the inside out
  • Breathable
  • Lightweight
  • Snug fit, plushy interior
  • Affordable price
  • Genuine leather on the palm for enhanced grip on your ski poles

Cons

  • Not ideal for extreme cold – below 20-25 degrees F seems to be the limit for these mittens
  • Touchscreen capabilities are moderate at best

Best Ski Mittens for Warmth: Black Diamond Mercury Mitts

If you are looking for optimal warmth, then you need to consider purchasing a pair of Black Diamond Mercury Mitts. Being that Black Diamond focuses on rock climbing and ski gear, you know these mittens are made for harsh conditions. In fact, these mittens perform exceptionally well and, for being mittens, also ranked high in dexterity. Mercury Mitts feature excellent construction that is great for a weekend ski trip but also for everyday use. The internal index finger slot is an excellent bonus, because you get better control in the mittens than other models. You can also use the hanging loop to dry out your mitts or to hang them from a harness or backpack.

The goatskin on the palm makes holding onto your ski poles much easier. Inside, Black Diamond’s Mercury Mitts have a liner that is made from 340 grams of Primaloft fleece and is coated with B.Dry waterproof material. Some reviewers did notice that the lining does pack out more quickly than other mittens, but for the affordable price, these mittens are a great buy.

Pros

  • Features a goatskin palm for added grip
  • 100% waterproof insert and removable liner with split-finger design
  • Has four-way stretch design
  • Kevlar stitching for increased durability
  • You can use the liner by itself
  • Draw cord cinch wrist
  • Models for both men and women are available

Cons

  • Runs a little on the small side
  • Clip that holds the mittens together is fragile

Best Heated Ski Mittens: Snow Deer Heated Ski Gloves

For those who don’t want to worry about their insulation getting damp or who have arthritic joints that need something extra, there are ski gloves with an internal heating element to keep you toasty. Snow Deer’s heated gloves are unisex, stylish, and made of high quality sheep leather. You can use them on the slopes or for everyday use. Although the gloves are rather thick because of the battery, you get plenty of dexterity in the fingers, and the interior is notably soft. With touchscreen compatibility, these gloves also make it easier to snap pictures of family and friends while enjoying your wintry holiday.

The gloves are heated by a small Li-ion battery that can heat up to 6 hours, depending on the heat setting. You can customize the fit by adjusting the Velcro wrist. Worried about your hands sweating? The interior comes with fleece for enhanced breathability and less moisture.

Pros

  • Made of polyester and sheep leather for wind and water resistance
  • Heats all the way to the fingertips
  • Touchscreen compatible index finger
  • Features a white illuminate strip
  • Adjustable wrists
  • Breathable fleece interior
  • Excellent dexterity
  • Decent battery life and charge time

Cons

  • Leather on the palms may wear off quickly
  • Slightly bulky because of the battery pocket

Buyer’s Guide: Finding the Best Ski Mittens

After checking over the reviews of the best ski mittens, you may have some questions. Although choosing mittens and ski gloves seems to be simple at first glance, it can be tricky. Choosing the wrong mitten could mean discomfort and frozen fingers after a few hours on the slopes. That is why we have put together this buyer’s guide to help you find the ski mittens that are best for you.

When it comes to choosing snow mittens, the one thing that you need to prioritize is warmth. You can figure out what level of warmth is best by considering the conditions where you are most likely to go skiing or snowboarding. If you plan on skiing someplace warmer or at the tail-end of the season, you could find mittens that are less insulated. Colder conditions would obviously call for more insulation.

Warmth is also dictated by a few factors: shell material, breathability, and water-resistance.

Shell Material

There are two main types of shells: leather and synthetic. Leather is usually goatskin or cowhide and is naturally water-resistant and flexible. When paired with a waterproof membrane, leather can be a wise investment that will last you for many years. Synthetic shells make up the bulk of what you will find in stores and usually use things like polyurethane or ePTE. Synthetics are breathable and usually resistant to water, so they are usually highly insulated.

Waterproof Membrane

If a glove is not appropriately waterproofed, the interior will get damp or even wet. This is dangerous, because your fingers could be exposed to frigid temperatures and get frostbite. Further, if the ski gloves or mittens do not have enough breathability, your own perspiration could make the interior damp. Therefore, both breathability and the level of water-resistance depends on the membrane.

Gore-Tex and Windstopper are popular membranes. Here is how they compare:

  • Gore-Tex – the benchmark for waterproof outerwear. If gloves and mittens come with Gore-Tex, you know they have some of the highest ratings of breathability and waterproofing available on the market.
  • Windstopper – from the same company that made Gore-Tex, Windstopper is made from ePTFE and is windproof and breathable but NOT waterproof. It is best for cold, dry conditions and comes coated with a Durable Water Repellent (DWR).

Hydro-Tex, which is used by Wildhorn’s Tolcat gloves, is similar to Gore-Tex and also functions the same way. If you can’t afford Gore-Tex gloves, Hydro-Tex or a similar material will work just fine.

Insulation

Next, you need to consider the type of insulation involved. Proper insulation will increase breathability. The most popular type of insulation is down—duck or goose feathers. The disadvantage with down is that, as it gets wetter, insulation decreases. Other examples of insulation include fibrefill—from polyester—and primaloft, a patented insulation material that is also water-resistant.

Additional Features

Now that you know the most important components of ski mittens, you should also consider features that could separate one pair from the next. The features you need depends on your personal preferences.

Cuff

Depending on the style of your ski jacket, the cuff length of your mittens could go one way or another. Some people prefer a long cuff to fit inside the sleeve of their jacket, while others might like a shorter cuff. If you plan on wearing a watch or a fitness tracker, a short cuff may be better.

Note that some mittens, like the Black Diamond Mercury Mitt, do not have a cuff but rather a “gauntlet” style that flares outward and a wrist cinch.

Zippered Pockets

Some mittens and ski gloves come with a zip pocket to hide your keys or to stuff a disposable hand warmer. The zip may also be used to help vent your mittens when the heat starts to turn up.

Nose Wipe

If you can find mittens or gloves with a soft piece of absorbent fabric on the thumb, you’ve found yourself a nose wipe. Sure, it may not be the coolest feature, but let’s face it—noses run on the slopes.

Reinforcements

Some mittens and gloves come with support and grips to make life easier. For example, a lot of snowboarding mittens and gloves come with wrist supports to help protect you from falls. Others may have grips along the palm or where the fingers are. Grips can also reinforce the durability of your ski mittens, so they last longer.

Sizing and Fit

Lastly, you need to ensure that your ski mittens are going to fit properly. Otherwise, you won’t be getting much use out of them. A ski mitten that fits correctly will provide you with enough room to move your fingers and grasp things. When measuring for size, go from the tip of your longest finger (middle finger) and then measure down to the wrist. The same is true for both mittens and gloves. The cuff should be long enough to protect your wrist from snow. Your fingers should never feel like they are getting jammed up against the fingertips of the glove or the end of the mitten. If so, the ski mittens or gloves are too small.

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